You Can Actually See The Aurora Borealis In Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. It’s no wonder that so many people flock to it each year. With its canals and bridges, historic architecture, and art museums, there is something for everyone in Saint Petersburg. One thing that makes Saint Petersburg even more special is its location. The city is located within the Arctic Circle, which means that it is one of the best places in the world to see the Northern Lights.

What are the Aurora Borealis?

The Aurora Borealis, also known as the Northern Lights, is a natural light display in the sky, predominantly seen in the high latitude (Arctic and Antarctic) regions.

They are created when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere and collide with gases like oxygen and nitrogen. The result is a stunning light show that appears in shades of green, pink, yellow, blue, and violet.

Although they can be seen throughout the year, they are most visible during the fall and winter months due to the longer nights. And while you can see them from many different locations around the world, Saint Petersburg is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of these celestial wonders.

scenery of aurora
Photo by Thomas Lipke on Unsplash

How To See The Aurora Borealis

If you want to see the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, in Saint Petersburg, you need to be aware of a few things. First, the best time to see them is between late September and early April. That’s because during those months, the Earth is pointing toward the sun and its atmosphere is filled with more particles that can reflect sunlight.

Second, you need to be far away from city lights. The best place to see the aurora is in a dark spot with an unobstructed view of the northern sky.

Finally, you need clear weather. Check the forecast before you go outside, and if it looks like there might be clouds in the way, try again another night.

Once you have all of that sorted out, find a comfortable spot to sit or lie down, and simply look up! The Aurora Borealis can appear as a faint glow on the horizon, or as bright streaks of light across the sky. And if you’re lucky enough to see them, they’ll definitely be a sight to remember.

When Is The Best Time To See Them?

The best time to see the Aurora Borealis in Saint Petersburg is from late September to early October. The days are shorter and the nights are longer, so there is more opportunity to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights. However, because Saint Petersburg is so far north, the sun does not rise very high in the sky during this time of year, so you will need to be patient and keep your eyes peeled for any sign of the aurora.

Where In Saint Petersburg Can You See Them?

There are a few different places in Saint Petersburg where you can see the Aurora Borealis. One of the best places to see them is from the top of the St. Isaac’s Cathedral. You can also see them from the Peter and Paul Fortress, as well as from various bridges and other high points around the city.

man standing beside the body of water with Aurora lights in the sky
Photo by Joshua Earle on Unsplash

What Should You Do While Watching Them?

If you want to see the Aurora Borealis in Saint Petersburg, there are a few things you should do in order to make the most of the experience. First, try to find a spot away from city lights so that you can get a clear view of the night sky.

Then, dress warmly and be prepared to spend some time outside as you wait for the Aurora Borealis to appear. Finally, keep your camera or phone handy so that you can capture the moment when the Northern Lights appear.

Conclusion

Saint Petersburg is one of the best places in the world to see the Aurora Borealis, and we hope that our tips have helped you plan your trip. If you’re interested in seeing this natural phenomenon, be sure to book your tickets early and dress warmly. With a little bit of luck, you’ll be able to witness one of the most beautiful sights on Earth.

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